British monuments in Delhi

1 10 2008

India Gate – Built as a memorial to commemorate the 70,000 India soldiers killed in World War I, India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and completed in 1931. Located on Rajpath, the road that leads to the magnificent Rashtrapati Bhawan, the gate is 160 feet high with an arch of 138 feet. Built from sandstone, the arch also houses the Eternal Flame, a gesture in memory of the Indian soldiers who laid their lives in the 1971 war with Pakistan.

The Secretariat Complex – Popularly known as the North Block and South Block the present seat of the ministry of Finance and External affairs respectively was the original Secretariat built on Raisina hill. These imposing structures are topped with Chatris on the corners giving it a typical oriental look.
Rashtrapati Bhavan & Mughal Gardens — Formely the Viceregal Lodge, the building is the highlight of Lutyen’s New Delhi and was completed in 1929 at a cost of 12,53,000 pound sterling. Located in an area of 130 hectares, the palace has 340 rooms. At one time, 2,000 people were required to look after the building and serve the Viceroy’s household. The lodge also has impressive garden called the Mughal Garden, which is open to public twice in a year, usually in February and March.

Parliament House – The seat of Indian Parliament is a marvelous piece of architecture designed by the famed architect Lutyens and constructed under the direct supervision of Sir Herbert Baker. Visitors are not allowed to loiter inside the building without special permission, for security reasons. For the foreign visitors permits are given only after they obtain an introductory letter from the respective embassy. Designed as a circular structure, the House is 171 meters in diameter and about one-third of a mile in circumference. The two semicircular house chambers flank the Central Hall with its impressive dome. The building has a continuous open corridor on the first floor fringed with a colonnade of 144 creamy sandstone pillars. The exterior walls of red sandstone are carved in geometric patterns that echo Moghul jaalis. It is a marvellous piece of architecture which can be admired only from outside on account of security restrictions. It is domed almost circular structure about a kilometer in circumference and is the seat of the Indian Parliament. During the sessions of Parliament there is a flurry of activity in and around the structure.

Teen Murti House – The Teen Murti Bhavan housed the first Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. It was designed by Robert Tor Russel, the architect of Connaught Place, and the Eastern and Western Courts on Janpath. The Bhavan was originally the residence of the Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces in India. However, after independence the house was taken over as the residence of Jawaharlal Nehru. And on his death, the house was converted into a national memorial comprising a library and a museum. The library is one of the finest ones for information on modern Indian history. The house gets its name after the Teen Murti (three statues) Memorial, which stands on its extensive grounds. The memorial was built in memory of the Indian soldiers who perished in World War I. The Bhavan is closed to public on Mondays and on all public holidays.

For further information log on to http://delhitourism.nic.in/ or Travelling to India- Famous Places in India or Delhi India- Delhi travel guide and Delhi Sightseeing-Historical monuments in Delhi.

About these ads

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: